Dream Visitations

Dream Visitations

Dream Visitations

I‘m long overdue for several Q&A posts. This one is a little more special because it’s from my grandma 🙂


Question from a reader:

“I hardly ever dream of my mother, maybe because I talk of her all the time with good memories? About 10 years ago I dreamed we were in the same room and she was washing dishes and I was asking her a question about picking polk and if it was poison. She turned to me with a smile, like always, and replied in a soft voice, “Now honey, you just follow your heart.” And then she dried her hands and told me what to look for. She went to the big long buffet and open the bottom drawer and pulled out a nice, clean flour sack and said, ‘Here is something to put them in.’

Your aunt Esther had a dream the other night about mother, too. A pretty long dream. I will just be brief. She didn’t know mom was alive and she was talking to me in the dream. She said it just broke her heart to know that she didn’t know mom was alive. She would have stayed home and taken good care of her had she known. What do you think these mean?”

If you read back through my dream interpretation archives, I cover the different kinds of dreams as well as how to go about interpreting them.

The first step to interpreting a dream is to ask yourself what was happening in your waking life at the time and what emotions you were experiencing. That will give you some context in which to interpret the symbolism.

My initial impression with your first dream was that you were struggling with some sort of decision and your mother’s response to your question in the dream was giving you guidance.

To me, the second dream seems to be bringing up unresolved emotions. Potentially guilt about things that weren’t done before her death.

According to Dreammoods.com (an online Jungian dream symbol dictionary):

To see and talk with your dead parents in your dreams represent your fears of losing them or your way of coping with the loss. You are using your dream as a last opportunity to say your final good-byes to them.

Xo,

Ash

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Dream Visitations

When Dreams Aren’t Just Dreams

When Dreams Aren’t Just Dreams

Question from a reader

“I have about 7 dream interpretation books. I have searched online, but can find no answer for this dream. I dreamed a healer was blowing a deep orange energy, like a mist, into my mouth through a tube as I lay in bed. It seemed to be a transference of energy. But what does that mean, exactly?”

Dreams aren’t always only symbolic. In some cases they can be very literal. The feeling I get about your experience is that it wasn’t necessarily a dream.

If you haven’t already, pick up a copy of Dolores Cannon’s The Custodians and have a read. It will give you some insight as to how and why some of us have those sort of experiences.

I had a dream somewhat like yours – not in content, but in context – a few years ago. I dismissed it as just a weird dream, until I read about several of the elements of it in The Custodians. It gave me an entirely new perspective (and gave some credence to some things that someone told me during a reading, once).

As for the dream itself, given that the energy was orange, I would associate that with the sacral chakra, so do some research on that particular chakra, the parts of the body it governs, the emotions that are associated with it, etc. and see if any of them apply to you.

Some other types of dreams that may not just be symbolic:

Xo,

Ash

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Why We Have Recurring Dreams

Why We Have Recurring Dreams

Why We Have Recurring Dreams

Question from a reader:

“My son, Jaden, passed away in 2012. He was 10 years old. He was also born with down syndrome, autism, medically fragile the entire time and I guess you can say cognitively, between 18 months old to 2 years old. So for about the last three years, I have had, I feel, intrusive dreams of my sons fragile state and all his surgeries.  I also have had many dreams of holding him in my belly to protect him over and over! Why these repetitive, specific dreams? Is it the healing process of chronic trauma, or PTSD, or part of the grieving process? Any suggestions?”

The purpose of our dreams, in the majority of instances, is to bring into our awareness emotions which need to be dealt with. Particularly when we have recurring dreams or repetitive dream themes, they are representative of a repeated message.

It’s easy, in situations like yours, to feel a loss of control – because you cannot do anything to change your son’s circumstances.

My initial impression of your dreams about wanting to protect him is that they are directly correlated with feelings of regret or helplessness about being unable to protect him when he was alive. Those feelings resurface for you, symbolically, through your dreams.

Is it the healing process or part of the grieving process? Probably both, although not directly.

The dreams are associated with emotions, and you can use them as an indicator of how you are moving through your healing and grieving process. They are showing you the things that you aren’t seeing, consciously.

Once you are able to process the emotions, consciously, the dreams will most likely stop or at least slow down significantly.

 

Xo,

Ash

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Why We Have Recurring Dreams

Types of Dreams

Types of Dreams

I‘ve gotten several question submissions recently and many of them are related to dreams. I will knock them out over the next couple of weeks, but this post should give the rest of you who submitted dream related questions a little bit of insight to the questions you asked.


Question from a reader:

“Why does it always happen that what I saw in my dreams happens in the future, but not the same thing – only a part of the dream?”

Dreams are very rarely 100% literal. As I mentioned in a previous blog post about dream interpretation, dreams are often a mix of varying types of symbolism:

Personal Symbolism
Personal symbolism found in dreams are things that have very specific meaning to you. Many dream interpreters will tell you that your personal symbolism should be given higher consideration than dream dictionary definitions, but I find that in many instances, both types of symbolism can carry meaning and you can get a fuller picture of what is being conveyed.

An example of personal symbolism might be hearing a song or seeing an animal that carries a specific meaning for you, seeing a place that has personal significance, etc.

Universal Symbolism
Universal dream archetypes exist in the collective consciousness and according to Carl Jung, possess the same meaning for every person on the planet. You can use an online dream dictionary such as Dreammoods.com to look up these symbols, however, an actual dream book will be more thorough than the online database. I own The Dream Dictionary from A-Z which includes almost exactly the same info as Dreammoods, but with even more information.

While dreams are personal, your personal experiences often touch on universal themes and symbols. These symbols are believed to occur in every culture throughout history. Jung identifies seven such symbols in what is referred to as the major archetypal characters.

These Archetypal dreams, also refer to as “mythic dreams”, “great dreams” or “grand dreams”, usually occur at significant times or transitional periods in your life. They often leave you with a sense of awe or that you have learned something important about yourself. Such dreams have a cosmic quality or an element of impossibility if occurred in reality. They are often extremely vivid and stay in your mind long after you had the dream.

In addition to symbolism, dreams also occur within various levels of consciousness:

Subconscious: Subconscious dreams typically give you symbolism about things that are occurring in your daily life – emotions that you aren’t dealing with, situations that are currently happening, etc. Sometimes subconscious dreams may make little sense but appear to simply be the mind categorizing what happened that week.

I find that with my own dreams, my mind will use these people, places and events as context to kick up more important information and themes.

Superconscious Dreams: Superconscious dreams can also be considered astral travel, visitation dreams, past life dreams, alternate life dreams, precognitive dreams or may include some of the archetypal themes mentioned above.

Many of my dreams tend to be a mix of all of these various types of symbolism and levels of consciousness, so when interpreting a dream, you have to be able to sort out which pieces are which in order get an accurate idea about what is being conveyed to you.

I suspect the reason your dreams do not play out in real life exactly as you dream them is because there are layers of symbolism filtered into them that have meaning for you, and most likely that meaning conveys a message about the parts of your dream which are precognitive.

Xo,

Ash

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Why We Have Recurring Dreams

How To Interpret Your Dreams

How To Interpret Your Dreams

Question from a reader:

“I have been awakening for awhile now and more comes all the time. Last night I had an experience of cool breath blowing into my mouth. I prayed Hail Mary and felt light glowing all inside and outside my body. My heart was so full and felt open and sharing energy. I heard so clearly, “We are taking you home.”   I dreamed of water and so many faces, and my house that I owned before I met my husband. I know the time is so different so it doesn’t mean I’m dying now. Or was it to say the dream was a visit home?”

Dream interpretation is always subject to the individual and their own symbolism, but it can be helpful to look up dream symbols in a Jungian dream dictionary like Dreammoods.com.

That’s why it’s really up to you to interpret your own dreams, as I can’t identify that personal symbolism for you.

An actual dream book will be more thorough than the online database. I own The Dream Dictionary from A-Z which includes almost exactly the same info as Dreammoods, but with even more information.

I often find that dreams can be a mix of personal symbolism and universal symbolism, and sometimes it’s not just one meaning or the other, but both. 

Just listening to your description, I think there’s a link between “We’re taking you home,” and the fact that you then saw an actual house that you used to live in.  This could perhaps allude to the past. Think about the person that you were, the challenges you were facing and the growth that you experienced during that time period.

From Dreammoods:

“To see your childhood home, your hometown, or a home that you previously lived in indicates your own desires for building a family and your family ideologies. It also reflects aspects of yourself that were prominent or developed during the time you lived in that home. You may experience some unfinished feelings that are being triggered by some waking situation. Alternatively, the dream may represent your outdated thinking.”

Were the faces that you saw people from that time period?

Water is indicative of emotional states. Consider the state of the water – was it turbulent or calm?

 

Xo,

Ash

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Seizing Your Personal Power Through Self-Destruction

Seizing Your Personal Power Through Self-Destruction

Seizing Your Personal Power Through Self-Destruction

Throughout my life, I’ve often experienced vivid dreams. Even growing up, I always felt there was some sort of significance to my dreams but I never knew how to go about figuring it out. It’s only over the last three years or so that I’ve begun to actively journal the things that I dream about and dissect the symbolism according to Jungian psychology and dream interpretation.

Last night’s dream was one of, if not singularly the most graphic and disturbing dreams I can recall ever experiencing. It was, by all accounts, what most people would consider a nightmare. But even nightmares contain subconscious truth when you look at them closely.

In my dream, I was staring at a gruesome scene. The background was black. There was someone standing next to me, but I never looked at them and they seemed almost invisible. In front of me was a woman with her arms outstretched, perhaps even tethered or chained. It would almost seem like a scene from a torture chamber or a horror movie.

Her body was flayed open both in the front and the back in such a way that you could see through the bones in her torso to the other side. Someone else, whose arms were all I could see, was ripping her bones out of her body, one by one. She screamed continuously.

I never took my eyes away from what was happening in front of me; the presence next to me said, “When the ego is stripped away, power is all that remains.” Then I woke up.

I immediately recognized the scene to be representation of something that I talk about fairly often: the construct of the human ego.

I often refer to the ego as a scaffolding that we build up around our true selves, each bar of the scaffolding represents a belief that we hold about who we are and what we are capable of, a coping mechanism we developed to minimize trauma, or a belief we taught ourselves about the world around us so that we could survive. That scaffolding constructs our personality, our habits, our patterns, and our outer identity. Who we think we are. Our false sense of self.

Many times those beliefs about who we are are extremely limited, self-deprecating, and detrimental to our wellbeing. It’s only through a long process of self-reflection and healing that we are able to identify what those beliefs are and let them go. In a way, you have to destroy your current self.

I understood that the scene that was being shown to me was representative of that process, each bone represented a piece of who this person believed she was, and they were slowly being torn away. It was painful. And it IS painful.

Looking within for the beliefs that are at the root of our ugliest emotions is not easy to do. It’s much easier to continue to blame someone else for “making” us feel the way we do, but the truth is, they are merely a trigger for something that already exists inside us. They’re just mirroring a familiar pattern, an imprint from a traumatic moment long ago that occurred with another person in another time, and in another place. And we need those people to help us identify those old wounds that still need to be healed.

It’s often the arguments, the hurt feelings, the most painful relationships we have with people that offer us the greatest opportunity for personal growth and development, if only we look closely enough to see it.

The imagery of the dream itself was exceptionally reminiscent of the depiction of the Death card in my Tarot deck from the Wild Unknown. It’s a decaying bird with outstretched wings that has nothing left but feathers and bones.

The message behind the Death card is one of transition, endings and beginnings, the decay of old belief structures and the rise of new opportunities. Death and rebirth. Personal transformation. That’s precisely the type of message you might receive during a period of self-reflection meant to tear down your ego.

Transition to what, though?

Personal empowerment. Once all of those limiting beliefs and personal traumas have been ripped out and discarded, all you are left with is a churning, swirling cosmic sea of creative potential ready to be moulded at your will. You are no longer defined by the egoic exoskeleton that grew with you from childhood to adulthood and then abruptly stopped expanding. You are free–truly free–to shed it and become whomever you choose, and that is powerful.

 

Xo,

Ash

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